Plastics-in-Motion 2015

Automotive Plastics Conference & Exhibit



CONFERENCE SESSIONS

TUESDAY, June 2, 2015

Session 1: Light-weight Automotive Components

Session 2: Bringing New Materials & Processes Online

Session 3: Specialty Automotive Applications

WEDNESDAY, June 3, 2015

Session 4: Advances in Structural Composites

Session 5: Plastics in Automotive Interiors, Exteriours, and Engine Compartment

Session 6: Innovations in Manufacturing & Assembly

THURSDAY, June 4, 2015

Session 7: Automotive Environmental Sustainability

Session 8: Novel Materials and Specialty Additives

CONFERENCE AGENDA

Click on a lecture title to view the abstract.

Monday, June 1, 2015

1:30 - 6:30pm   Workshop: Nanomaterials in Automotive

7:30 - 9:00pm   Welcome Reception & Check-in


Tuesday, June 2, 2015


7:30am

Continental Breakfast

8:15am

Keynote Address: Driving Profitable Growth in the Global Automotive Plastics Industry Daron Gifford, Plante Moran

Keynote Address: Driving Profitable Growth in the Global Automotive Plastics Industry

Daron Gifford, Plante Moran

The presentation will highlight Plante & Moran's research on 5 Megatrends in the automotive industry, especially focused on the potential impacts on plastics manufacturers. The megatrends will be followed by presentation of the annual benchmarking results on the operating performance of plastics manufacturers in North America. In conclusion, the key industry drivers of profitable growth and the importance of a company's business strategy and action plans will be discussed.

Session 1: Light-weighting Automotive Components

9:00am

Strategies for Light-Weighting Plastics Paul A. Hardy, A. Schulman, Inc

Strategies for Light-Weighting Plastics

Paul A. Hardy, A. Schulman, Inc

Light weighting plastics has become a necessity for automotive manufactures to meet mandated mileage tariffs.There are several different approaches that a plastic compounder and a part designer /molder can use to obtain weight reduction in molded plastic parts. This presentation will explore the options of product selection, filler selection, alloy technology, part design, polymer structure modification and other technology.This presentation will review the technology tied to each of these approaches as well as some advantages and disadvantages of each. Case studies will be included to tie these strategies to actual commercialized applications with documented weight savings that were obtained.

The presentation outline:

  • State current amount of plastics on vehicles, government tariff targets, mandate dates and define the impact of weight reduction to the miles per gallon.
  • List part functionality criteria that has to be considered when determining the best option to utilize when light weighting plastic parts.
  • Impact of the plastic compounder for light weighting plastic parts
    Product Selection — metal to nylon, nylon to polypropylene, injection molding to blow molding
    Filler Selection — glass fiber, mineral fillers, natural fibers
    Alloy technology — nylon blends with, ABS, ASA, and PP
  • Part design and/or molders ability to light weighting plastic parts
    Part Design — thin wall technology through part design, plastic compounds to better enable thin walling
    Polymer structure modification — foaming agents, gas injection, water injection
    Some relative cost analysis, associated technology and some advantages and disadvantages of the technology
    Case studies will be provided to support several of the above light weighting methods.

9:30am

Light-weighting Automotive Components Mohammad Moetakef, Abdul Sami Siddiqui and Mohammad Usman, Ford Motor Co.

Light-weighting Automotive Components

Mohammad Moetakef, Abdul Sami Siddiqui and Mohammad Usman, Ford Motor Co.

Ford F150 shows a strong commitment of Ford for implementing lightweighting technologies into the vehicle with the highest volume of sales in North America for the last 36 years. It also indicates an overall trend towards mass produced lightweight vehicles to improve the fuel economy and reduce its carbon foot-print on the Global environment. The challenge is that it must be done without compromising safety, performance, recyclability and cost.

Ford has developed and patented a unique surface design, PolyDome, with special features that significantly reduces the minimum required thickness of a plastic component for NVH. This patented design helps reduce noise level by ~3dB with 3.5mm thick component that would otherwise be achieved with a 6.5mm thick component. It will not only reduce the part weight but also reduce the material and the manufacturing cost without compromising material strength. This design topology can be deployed to achieve desired NVH targets for plastic components of Engine and Air Induction system.


10:00am

Weight Reduction in Automotive with High Performance Polyamides. Bernd Henkelmann, Application Development Manager Automotive, EMS-GRIVORY

Weight Reduction in Automotive with High Performance Polyamides.

Bernd Henkelmann, Application Development Manager Automotive, EMS-GRIVORY

Based on more than 20 years of continuous development, new materials are offered for weight reduction opportunities in automotive metal replacement applications. Enhanced properties across flow direction and easy flow characteristics of Grivory GVX allow for wall thickness reduction, without loss of performance. Local stress peaks and high load areas can be reinforced with ribbons from the EMS-TAPE-TECHNOLOGY portfolio. In addition, long-carbon-fiber reinforced products offer high stiffness and strength in combination with excellent friction properties.

10:30am Coffee Break & View of Exhibits

11:00am

Multi-material approach for lightweighting structures in safety systems Vasant Pednekar, LANXESS Corporation

Multi-material approach for lightweighting structures in safety systems

Vasant Pednekar, LANXESS Corporation

With more stringent CAFÉ standards ahead, the need for weight reduction becomes crucial for achieving more miles per gallon. Applications using composites could be one of the strong alternatives for weight reduction in cars. As a part of joint development, Lanxess and Takata developed an multi-material airbag housing using Tepex® composite sheet and Durethan® BKV240H2.0 (PA6 40% GF, Impact modified) resin which resulted in weight savings of over 35% and passes all the required tests. This presentation gives an overview of the steps including simulation and manufacturing for achieving this Ultra-light airbag housing.


11:30am

Rapid structural bonding of dissimilar lightweight materials: polyolefins, composites and metals W.S. Gutowski, S.Li, C.Filippou, L.Russell, CSIRO, Future Manufacturing Flagship, Australia

Rapid structural bonding of dissimilar lightweight materials: polyolefins, composites and metals

W.S. Gutowski, S.Li, C.Filippou, L.Russell, CSIRO, Future Manufacturing Flagship, Australia

The automotive industry has successfully build lightweight vehicles with fuel-efficient engines in order to minimise fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in accordance with legal requirements. Consequently, low density metals such as aluminium, magnesium as well as polymers and fibre-reinforced composites come to the focus of car manufacturers.

Rapidly growing need for practical use of such diverse materials as metals, plastics and high-tech composite materials raises the issue of rapid bonding technologies which enable the use of new material combinations providing structural advantages for bonded components versus other joining methods.

Various alternatives of bonding techniques as well as commodity and specialty surface treatments methods including chemical, flame, corona discharge and plasma treatments are also discussed in this paper. We also demonstrate practical examples of the use of CSIRO processes for adhesion control in the automotive industry in specific applications currently in use by companies such as General Motors, Toyota, and Ford.


12:00pm

Go Beyond Foaming: Learn how to maximize all the automotive benefits provided by MuCell technology with design freedom Brent Strawbridge, Vice President, Trexel

Go Beyond Foaming: Learn how to maximize all the automotive benefits provided by MuCell technology with design freedom

Brent Strawbridge, Vice President, Trexel

This discussion will demonstrate how to maximize your weight reduction by designing fan shrouds with standard MuCell molding principles and design and additionally using MuCell on door carriers achieving up to 40% weight reduction using the expansion molding process. MuCell molding also offers many additional benefits beyond foaming. Learn about the additional benefits and how to utilize them in your molding process. Benefits such as reduced cycle time, reduced molding tonnage, improved dimensional stability, material substitutions and design freedom are all possible with MuCell.

12:30-2:00pm


Lunch Break (on your own)
Session 2: Bringing New Materials & Processes Online

2:00pm

Plenary Lecture: Improving Production Part Approval Process (PPAP) and Validation Procedures; Why Inconsistent Parts are Made John W. Bozzelli, Founder of Scientific Molding

Plenary Lecture: Improving Production Part Approval Process (PPAP) and Validation Procedures; Why Inconsistent Parts are Made

John W. Bozzelli, Founder of Scientific Molding

The automotive industry has extensive requirements for PPAP which has the potential to produce product consistently, meeting requirements during actual production. The time and cost to go through this production part approval process is significant and results are not always what they should be for the substantial effort expended. This session will cover selected issues relative to DOE's, cooling, calibration and injection molding machine functions that would dramatically improve PPAP studies and results.


2:45pm

The Value of Systems Engineering to the OEM's and Automotive Suppliers John Berg, MGS Mfg.

The Value of Systems Engineering to the OEM's and Automotive Suppliers

John Berg, MGS Mfg.

A systems engineering-based communication plan between OEM and supplier groups is a best practice method to enable weight reduction, component consolidation, part performance improvements, part strength / rigidity, highly polished / textured surface aesthetics and tactile feel. The fundamental approach of integrated and cofunctioning engineering groups enables a higher success rate for product development and launch. For projects with the potential for significant impact, an investment in proactive / scheduled communications between product design, design-for-manufacture, tooling design / build / sample, resin supply, pre-production (process development, metrology, steel adjustments…) and production (injection mold & press / robotic / automation equipment integration and validation, launch) results in a well monitored and supported work flow.


3:00pm

Monitor, Measure and Improve the Automotive Supply Chain Sujit Sheth, Business Development and Program Manager, AST Technology

Monitor, Measure and Improve the Automotive Supply Chain

Sujit Sheth, Business Development and Program Manager, AST Technology

When it comes to plastic injection molded parts, your supply chain begins with the mold that is used to create the part. This means that your supply chain includes the tool makers, injection molders, engineers, project managers, procurement managers and supply chain strategists. However, the language spoken throughout your supply chain is not the same. At the base of the supply chain, where the plastic parts and tooling are manufactured, the participants have a high level of technical knowledge and expertise. Further up the supply chain this technical knowledge may not exist. In many cases this causes confusion and inefficient communication.

Monitoring and measuring provides Supply Chain Transparency that allows you to know the condition, performance and maximum output of your assets based on the current condition of your fleet of tools. Furthermore, it encourages communication throughout your supply chain using data and information that is recognized and understood by all stakeholders.

The purpose of this paper is to examine how current low-cost technologies can be used to monitor measure and improve your automotive supply chain. We will demonstrate how these technologies can be used to generate quantitative baselines for your molds. Then we will study how deviations from the baseline can be used by both technical and non-technical stakeholders to identify and address troubled and inferior tooling as well as other weak links in the supply chain before they become much more costly complications downstream.


3:15pm

Panel Discussion: OEMs Suppliers Interaction

Panel Discussion: OEMs Suppliers Interaction

Many OEMs want their suppliers to provide engineering expertise in developing new materials, molding technologies and processes to reduce the overall cost to manufacture and meet regulatory demands, yet the upfront costs of doing this cannot solely be on the shoulders of the supplier. The panel discussion will address this issue.

Panelists:

  • Clare Goldsberry, Sr. Editor, PlasticsToday.com/Owner ProWrite Communications
  • John Berg, Director of Marketing, MGS Mfg. Group
  • John Bozzelli, Founder of Scientific Molding
  • Sujit Sheth, General Manager, AST North America
  • Probir Guha, VP, Advanced Research & Development, Continental Structural Plastics

4:00pm


Coffee Break & View of Exhibits

Session 3: Specialty Automotive Applications

4:15pm

Aramid nanofibers for use as separator material in li-ion and li-s battery design. Daniel Vander Ley, Co-founder, Elegus Technologies

Aramid nanofibers for use as separator material in li-ion and li-s battery design.

Daniel Vander Ley, Co-founder, Elegus Technologies

Aramid nanofibers represent a new material with unique and contrarian properties when composed in nonwoven sheet form. ANF based separator material is ultra-strong (5GPa), flexible, thermally stable (>400°c), elongation resistant (<5% at 200°c) and nanoporous. The ANF separator further combines essential, competitive mechanical properties, allowing for high capacity, high discharge rate batteries that can withstand the harsh operating conditions being seen today. ANF separators represent an ideal solution to increase battery cell design safety, due to the materials ultra-strong and nanoporous properties, dendrite suppression and reduction of soft-shorts by 20x is expected.


4:45pm

Automotive Heads Up Displays take center stage Steven Polvinen, Dir of Business, Syntec Optics

Automotive Heads Up Displays take center stage

Steven Polvinen, Dir of Business, Syntec Optics

Once again the automotive industry grasps new technology into its own vibrant blood stream. Heads Up Display (HUD) is one of the hottest technological inventions of recent years. Adding this dynamic optical imaging system is the next hierarchy to the "enhanced sound system" we all appreciate. Benefits of monitoring multiple activities with a smoother, less distracting (safety) operation of the vehicle.

The HUD image appears out in front of the driver, near the front end of the vehicle. This projected image is created with a custom contoured enhanced aluminum coated polymer mirror optically designed to match the windshield of the specific vehicle. Also, molded plastic light pipes create pinpoint illumination to enhance HUD's critical information.

Benefits include reduced cost, weight by using plastic optics instead of glass (~50%), and the ability to add mechanical features to the mirror help eliminate (typically metal) mounting components.


5:15pm

LED car lighting systems in focus Kragl Joachim, Engel

LED car lighting systems in focus

Kragl Joachim, Engel

Multi layer lens molding technology allows for a dramatic reduction of cycle time which leads to increased productivity. Especially in LED lighting systems very thick lenses are required, thus extremely long cycle times would result with conventional molding processes. In order to achieve better optical quality or surface feature replication multi layer molding technology can also be combined with variothermal processing technologies offering process relevant advantages. The presentation will provide an overlook at the current state of the technology.


6:00pm


Cheese & Wine Reception


Wednesday, June 3, 2015

7:30am Continental Breakfast

Session 4: Advances in Structural Composites

8:15am

Plenary Lecture: Carbon Fiber Composites Roadmap: Growth to 2020 and Beyond Ross Kozarsky, Lux Research

Plenary Lecture: Carbon Fiber Composites Roadmap: Growth to 2020 and Beyond

Ross Kozarsky, Lux Research

Carbon-fiber reinforced plastics (CFRPs) combine high strength and light weight, making these materials attractive to many industries. However, due to high costs and other technical hurdles, thus far their use has mostly been restricted to high-end niche applications. This presentation will review Lux Research's carbon fiber cost modeling and market forecast analyses, examine the major challenges to be overcome for enabling commercialization in higher volume applications, and highlight key developers working on disruptive innovations.


8:45am

Manufacturing of High Volume and High Quality Surfaces of Automotive Composite Parts through Resin Transfer Molding Process Jim Switzer, Henkel

Manufacturing of High Volume and High Quality Surfaces of Automotive Composite Parts through Resin Transfer Molding Process

Jim Switzer, Henkel

Given the automotive industry's current focus on improving fuel efficiency - including meeting CAFE standards - lightweighting has emerged as a preeminent possible solution to meet today's high standards. Fiber-reinforced plastics in particular are growing in popularity as a lightweight material option in modern car concepts. Based on the technical paper, High Volume Structural Composite Part Production: Paintable parts right out of the mold through Surface Resin Transfer Molding and its key findings, Switzer will speak to Henkel's new generation of polyurethane matrix resin and how it is helping speed composite production. Due to the excellent compatibilities of chemistries for matrix resin, paint and mold release, a far quicker process has been demonstrated compared to current labor- and cost-intensive surface treatment and painting procedures, which is essential for efficient mass production.


9:15am

Lightweight Composite Solutions for Automotive Applications Probir Guha, VP, Advanced Research and Development, Continental Structural Plastics

Lightweight Composite Solutions for Automotive Applications

Probir Guha, VP, Advanced Research and Development, Continental Structural Plastics

The current needs of the automotive industry to make vehicles lighter and more fuel efficient have created an immense opportunity for composite material technology innovation. This paper will define the gaps that exist between existing composite products and the light weighting needs for the automotive industry and discuss some of the technologies that have been developed to fill these gaps. Also, the paper will demonstrate how a materials, process and design development effort has shown a path to significant weight reduction in automotive body panels and structural components, often meeting and surpassing the capabilities the industry is seeing with innovations in various metals.

Past advances have shown that a lower density, advanced composite material based on fiberglass and unsaturated polyester technology can be manufactured with sufficient mechanical properties and weight reduction; but applications are limited to structural or non-Class A applications. However, recent advancements have shown that a Class A surface with acceptable mechanical properties can be achieved in a 1.2 specific-gravity, low-density composite.

This 1.2 specific-gravity material is achieved using hollow glass microspheres in place of very dense calcium carbonate filler to lower the density in Class A sheet molding compound (SMC). Non-functionalized glass microspheres are the direct cause of poor mechanical and physical properties in SMC due to an abundance of weak interfacial interactions. CSP has recently developed chemistry that modifies the surface of the glass microspheres and causes them to bond directly with the resin matrix. This innovative modification results in a strengthened bubble-matrix interface and greatly improves the overall properties of the composite.

This breakthrough in materials technology represents the next generation of lightweight materials. The next challenge involves getting automakers to approve and adopt these new technologies in place of proven materials like aluminum. This adoption will come through the on-going reinforcement of the numerous advantages that advanced composites offer over metals, including improved corrosion and dent resistance; the ability to achieve distinctive styling cues that can't be done with metal stamping, and significantly reduced tooling costs.


9:45am

Nanosilica-Modified Epoxy Resins for Use in Filament-Wound Drive Shaft Applications Dr. James Nelson, Senior Product Development Specialist, 3M Aerospace and Commercial Transportation Division

Nanosilica-Modified Epoxy Resins for Use in Filament-Wound Drive Shaft Applications

Dr. James Nelson, Senior Product Development Specialist, 3M Aerospace and Commercial Transportation Division

This paper explores and illustrates the enhanced properties of filament wound carbon-fiber tubes for drive shafts resulting from significantly increased matrix stiffness. This matrix modulus increase is achievable by incorporating surface-modified nanosilica into the matrix resin at a very high weight fraction. Improvements in buckling torque, first natural frequency of lateral vibration, and torsional vibration response are examined by exercising design equations for a candidate drive shaft construction. Inputs to the shaft design equations are calculated from micromechanics equations to determine lamina properties from matrix and fiber properties, which in turn are used to calculate the laminate properties relative to the axial and hoop directions of a tube. An experimental study was performed in order to support and illustrate the effects studied by calculation, as well as to provide a check on the overall calculation scheme. Properties for a high modulus nanosilica-modified matrix resin (3M™ Matrix Resin 4833) and unfilled control resin were measured. Filament winding was used to create carbon fiber composite tubes using the resins. The axial and hoop stiffness of the tubes were measured and compared to theory.


10:15am


Coffee Break & View of Exhibits

Session 5: Plastics in Automotive Interiors, Exteriors, and Engine compartment

10:30am

Inherently Low Gloss Bayblend for automotive interior applications Dr. Marina A. Rogunova, Bayer MaterialScience

Inherently Low Gloss Bayblend for automotive interior applications

Dr. Marina A. Rogunova, Bayer MaterialScience

Over the past few decades, society has increasingly moved towards personalization, especially when it comes to design. This trend is apparent in many industries, one of them being the automotive industry. To win over consumers, automotive interior designs must feature improved component functionality without sacrificing an elegant, luxurious appearance. Automotive original equipment manufacturers are consistently looking for low-gloss materials for interior applications that can stand up to years of wear and tear and environmental exposure yet maintain aesthetic quality without painting.

Polycarbonate and poly(acrylonitrile butadiene styrene) (PC/ABS) blends are the material of choice for automotive applications in both interior and exterior trims, largely due to the combination of easy processability and good physical/mechanical properties. Injection molding of polycarbonate blends produces a glossy appearance requiring surface finishes or paints to deliver low gloss surfaces. Our customers expressed a need for easy-to-process alternatives to PP. Based on their feedback, the objectives of the material development were framed with Bayer's interest and the customer needs in mind: 1) Achieve gloss levels equal to PP but with engineering material properties; 2) Provide a cost save for customers (remove paint cost).

Bayblend LGX 300 resin is a unique polycarbonate (PC) blend inherently low in gloss with high flow which allows it to accurately replicate different types of surface finishes. It achieves gloss levels significantly lower than the materials targeted for displacement by PP at the automotive OEMS. An innovative approach has been developed to reduce the surface gloss of PC blends. Through the novel use of functional additives and modifiers, the gloss of a new LG Bayblend blend was lowered to state of the art levels, meeting objectives 1 and 2. The reduction in the gloss level for this new LG Bayblend is primarily due to the inherent low gloss nature of the material. Bayblend® LGX 300 resins exhibits good weathering, scratch and mar resistance. Another important attribute of Bayblend LGX 300 is its low-emission characteristic, which is particularly important as automotive manufacturers strive to reduce the levels of VOCs in their automobiles to improve the interior environment and meet federal regulations.


11:00am

Solution for Aesthetic Parts thru combination of Styrenics resins with decorative films Joerg Bachschuster, Kurz, and John Fialka (speaker), Styrolution

Solution for Aesthetic Parts thru combination of Styrenics resins with decorative films

Joerg Bachschuster, Kurz, and John Fialka (speaker), Styrolution

Versatile design trends in automotive required creative and robust solutions. The combination of decorative films with mass colored resins opens the door for new routes answering aesthetic expectations and fulfilling the technical requirements for interior and exterior parts. This joint presentation from Leonhard Kurz and Styrolution 2 global companies will overview related processing options, detail tests results for In Mold Decoration and Hot Stamping films on various styrenics resins or blends and showcase some running innovative applications. The last technical developments in term of functionality - eg touchpad, backlighting - mechanical or thermal enhancements will be covered with an emphasis on how film and resin combination reduce process complexity in reducing step numbers.


11:30am

ADVANTAGES OF DIRECT GEAR DESIGN FOR AUTOMOTIVE POLYMER GEAR DRIVES Alexander L. Kapelevich (speaker), AKGears, and Thomas M. McNamara, Thermotech

ADVANTAGES OF DIRECT GEAR DESIGN FOR AUTOMOTIVE POLYMER GEAR DRIVES

Alexander L. Kapelevich (speaker), AKGears, and Thomas M. McNamara, Thermotech

In comparison with traditional gear design based on preselected, typically standard generating rack parameters and its addendum modification also known as the X-shift, the alternative Direct Gear Design® method provides significant benefits for custom high-performance gear drives that include: increased load capacity, lifetime and efficiency; reduced size and weight, noise and vibrations, cost, etc.

The main advantage of traditionally designed machine metal gears is broad availability of the standard cutting tooling: gear hobs, shaper cutters, broaches, etc. This advantage is completely diminished for injection molded polymer gears that are used in wide variety of automotive gear mechanisms. Every plastic gear requires its own dedicated nonstandard molding tool cavity. It makes Direct Gear Design very suitable for automotive plastic gears.

This paper introduces the Direct Gear Design method, demonstrates its benefits for plastic gears and for metal to plastic conversion in automotive drives. It also presents gear polymers selection approach and demonstrates specific automotive gear application examples.

12:00 - 1:30pm
Lunch Break (on your own)

1:30pm

Next Generation, High Performance Materials for Air Induction Components Russell Bloomfield, Sr. Application Development Engineer, DSM Engineering Plastics

Next Generation, High Performance Materials for Air Induction Components

Russell Bloomfield, Sr. Application Development Engineer, DSM Engineering Plastics

DSM Engineering Plastics has developed new, super stabilized materials for air induction applications. The materials offer superior heat deflection temperature (HDT) as compared to material solutions available today, excellent chemical resistance to low pH environment, and robust, long-term thermal ageing performance. The mechanical properties of these materials make them ideal for metal replacement on hot charge air ducts, and the excellent weld strength retention also make them prime candidates for air intake manifolds with integrated charge air coolers. The presentation will highlight the performance attributes of these material grades.


2:00pm

Smart ways of designing plastic engine parts using High Performance Engineering Polymers (HPEP) Kirit C. Desai, Technical Marketing Manager, Solvay Specialty Polymers

Smart ways of designing plastic engine parts using High Performance Engineering Polymers (HPEP)

Kirit C. Desai, Technical Marketing Manager, Solvay Specialty Polymers

Prospect for plastics in auto industry has never been as buoyant as OEMs are identifying new ways to reduce the number and weight of under-hood parts to meet tougher CAFE regulations and stricter emissions standards. The new developments in plastic materials and technological breakthrough in design and production have created a number of in-roads for engine parts offering light weight and improved performance.

In today's competitive world, speed to the global market place plays a major role in overall success. With the help of successful metal to plastic conversion programs for air induction, and thermal management, the paper explains the benefits of following items in not only reducing overall product development cycle time, but also the manufacturing cost and weight.

  1. Unique property of Amodel PPA) in molding pull pass barb
  2. Part consolidation and integration
  3. Development of new high heat grade of Amodel for under hood environment
  4. Ultra Performance polymers for turbocharger and supercharger applications.

2:30pm

Counterfeit Plastics: Are Your Parts the Real Deal? Clare Goldsberry, Sr. Editor, PlasticsToday.com/Owner ProWrite Communications

Counterfeit Plastics: Are Your Parts the Real Deal?

Clare Goldsberry, Sr. Editor, PlasticsToday.com/Owner ProWrite Communications

One of the biggest and costliest problems that many OEMs have is ensuring that the plastic components they purchase from their various molded parts suppliers are the real deal. Is the material from which the parts are molded actually the polymer spec'd for the parts? In the recent case of the Aston Martin accelerator-pedal arm, it wasn't. The material was "counterfeit" - i.e. it wasn't the material that Aston Martin spec'd and it resulted in the recall of 17,000 cars due the breakage of accelerator-pedal arms.

This presentation explores the problem of counterfeit plastic, counterfeit parts, and how OEMs can ensure that the material they specify is the material from which the parts are actually molded. What you can do to help avoid these problems before you face a recall:

  1. Material Taggants
  2. Material Certification
  3. Molded-in labels/holograms

3:00pm


Coffee Break & View of Exhibits

Session 6: Innovations in Manufacturing & Assembly

3:15pm

Direct Coating / Direct Skinning Technology Jessee McCanna, Bayer

Direct Coating / Direct Skinning Technology

Jessee McCanna, Bayer

Bayer MaterialScience is developing Direct Coating/Direct Skinning (DCDS) technology in its Pittsburgh location. DCDS combines standard injection molding with reaction injection molding in a single mold, utilizing a PC-based substrate with a polyurethane coating or aliphatic (or aromatic) self-skinning foam. The integration of the two processes can reduce the overall part cost, compared to current manufacturing methods, while increasing quality, performance, design freedom, and product differentiation.


3:45pm

Plasma technology for efficient polymer manufacturing and durable adhesive bonding Uwe Lommatzsch, Klaus Vissing, Jörg Ihde, Ralph Wilken, Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Applied Materials Research

Plasma technology for efficient polymer manufacturing and durable adhesive bonding

Uwe Lommatzsch, Klaus Vissing, Jörg Ihde, Ralph Wilken, Fraunhofer Institute for Manufacturing Technology and Applied Materials Research IFAM, Department of Adhesive Technology and Surfaces, 28359 Bremen, Germany

Plasma technology allows modifying surfaces to achieve specific effects, like adhesion promotion or scratch protection. The talk will present the use of a low pressure plasma coating to allow the demolding of polymers without release agents. The coating is applied to the mold surface. This makes it possible that the demolded part can further processed immediately and no additional cleaning to remove residuals from the release agent is necessary. The plasma process not only allows depositing a release coating directly inside a mold, but also on a polymeric film that can be draped into a mold. The film coating process has a much higher flexibility in the application and reduces the production cost dramatically. The deposition process and results for the demolding of polyurethane components will be presented.

The second part of the presentation will focus on polymer treatment with atmospheric pressure plasma jets. It will be shown, that plasma jet treatment is a very useful method to give a boost for light weight constructions by facilitating adhesive bonding. Results for the pretreatment of different polymers to guarantee durable adhesive joints will be presented. By depositing thin films using the atmospheric plasma for adhesion promotion liquid primers can be replaced in the joining process. This treatment provides therefore an economically and eco-efficient alternative to the conventional application of liquid primers on polymers, glass and metals.


4:15pm

Functional integration of ultrasonic welding technology for the automotive plastics industry Udo Skarke, Sales Director Plastics, Herrmann Ultrasonics, Inc.

Functional integration of ultrasonic welding technology for the automotive plastics industry

Udo Skarke, Sales Director Plastics, Herrmann Ultrasonics, Inc.

In semi-automated multi-head machines for the automotive industry, several processes are often jointly integrated to achieve high functional density in confined spaces. Plastic parts assembly functions, component detection and sensing features, as well as various test processes are added to the actual plastic joining process. The ultrasonic welding machine interconnects all auxiliary functions and creates interfaces.

The conventional concept of functional integration for the automotive industry originates from design theory pursuing the goal of covering as many technical functions as possible with as few components as possible. Today, it is an indispensable principle of modern automotive manufacturing processes: several process steps are combined in one production unit to improve the added value potential. There is no need to interrupt the process chain; this contributes to reducing unit costs and increasing production safety.

Integration of auxiliary functions has long been common practice, with obvious advantages: Plastic components with sensitive surfaces only have to be handled once when being inserted into the suitable fixture. Prevention of unnecessary part handling saves time and protects the product.

Also identifying plastic components, selecting pre-set parameters, and saving weld process data are basic requirements for the control architecture and ultrasonic generator software. This data is provided to an overriding PLC via conventional fieldbus interfaces and in a data base all information is allocated to the component. But not only documentation of plastic weld process parameters is part of a complete traceability; single component marking and tagging is also crucial for identification.

One concept can be a standard modular plastic ultrasonic welder, set up in combination with a touch-sensitive small-scale robot, a camera, and a marking device. The robot makes multi-axle handling of the applications possible. A camera checks the plastic parts for their quality and completeness. After the weld process, all parts are individually marked, providing the current date and time and a unique application number.

In the future, it will become easier to integrate other processes and auxiliary functions and thus supply supplementary functions from a single source. Function integration simplifies production monitoring and quality assurance processes in the automotive industry. Herrmann Ultrasonics is going the extra mile and implementing further development of existing products to prepare them for "industry 4.0".


4:45pm

Tailor Made Surfaces of automotive parts in a Single Production Step Kragl Joachim, Engel

Tailor Made Surfaces of automotive parts in a Single Production Step

Kragl Joachim, Engel

The presentation provides an introduction and overview of various Engel processes, which offer entirely new ways to combine various technologies to create several surfaces in one production step.

Processes discussed will include Dophin in which a soft touch skin is created in a 2 component process utilizing MuCell. Presentation will also include Clearmelt where either a high gloss surface or soft foam is created in one injection molding machine with 2 components Polyurethane. The paper closes with discussion on variotherm and Varymelt technology which create either high gloss or extremely soft touch surfaces.


5:15pm

Additive Manufacturing Solutions Michael Wegman, Stratasys

Additive Manufacturing Solutions

Michael Wegman, Stratasys

An overview of the Additive Manufacturing /3D Printing Market and it's evolution, exploring the solutions and benefits realized by using these tools in manufacturing. Identifying when to use traditional manufacturing tools versus additive manufacturing will be addressed. The emphasis will be on applications in traditional manufacturing environments to reduce cycle time, improve manufacturing cost ratios, and increase design-for-manufacturing freedom. In house manufacture of tools, fixtures, molds, patterns, gauges and end use parts will be discussed.


Thursday, June 4, 2015

7:30am Continental Breakfast

Session 7: Automotive Environmental Sustainability

8:00am

Plenary Lecture: Cost-Effective Bioplastics and Biocomposites for Automotive Applications Minh-Tan Ton-That, Karen Stoeffler, Mihaela Mihai, Automotive & Surface Transportation, National Research Council of Canada

Plenary Lecture: Cost-Effective Bioplastics and Biocomposites for Automotive Applications

Minh-Tan Ton-That, Karen Stoeffler, Mihaela Mihai, Automotive & Surface Transportation, National Research Council of Canada

Due to oil price rise and new environmental policies, there is a need for decreasing the fuel consumption and emissions of vehicles, and for reducing their global environmental impact. Besides the improvement of motor efficiency, main strategies used by the automotive industry to reach those goals are weight reduction, integration of green materials and recyclability.

Although several bio-based thermoplastics, such as polylactide (PLA) or polybutylene succinate (PBS), are now commercially available, they often don't meet the mechanical, thermal and durability requirements of the automotive industry. On the other hand, durable bio-based thermoplastics such as bio-polyolefins are still under development.

NRC has developed a number of practical plastics and composites solutions integrating up to 50 wt.% renewable content and having the potential to compete with conventional materials such as mineral-filled / glass-reinforced polymers. In this presentation, focus will be put on polyolefin and on polyamide materials reinforced with cellulosic fibers for automotive applications. Specific issues related to biomaterials, such as mechanical and thermal performance, moisture absorption, physical aging, odour and VOC emissions physical as well as flammability will be discussed.


8:30am

Recycled Rubber as a Replacement for Virgin Materials in Automotive Part Formulations Janice L. Tardiff (speaker), Cynthia M. Flanigan, Madeline M. Harper
Ford Motor Company

Recycled Rubber as a Replacement for Virgin Materials in Automotive Part Formulations

Janice L. Tardiff (speaker), Cynthia M. Flanigan, Madeline M. Harper
Ford Motor Company

The use of recycled materials in automotive parts is increasing but these materials are often used at low levels or as fillers in rubber formulations. While any use of recycled material is positive, a target for Ford Motor Company is to increase the incorporation of recycled rubber as a productive component in the formulation.

Recycled rubber can include both the rubber crumb itself or alternative materials from the recycling of rubber such as carbon black. Previous studies have shown that replacing like for like shows the greatest promise for success. For example, using recycled EPDM (ethylene propylene diene monomer) in EPDM recipes or recycled natural rubber in natural rubber recipes results in compounds with performance characteristics most similar to model rubber formulations. However, replacing virgin rubber in a formulation with recycled rubber crumb can be challenging due to the impurities present in the recycled product. This study focuses on how recycled rubber crumb and recycled carbon black can be used as replacements for virgin materials in rubber formulations. Technical case studies are presented using model EPDM and natural rubber recipes. Comparisons are made to control formulations that represent automotive parts. Key technical challenges and the potential outlook for the use of recycled rubber are discussed.


9:00am

Reclaimed Carbon Fiber (rCF) in Blend with Polypropylene Resin Saeil JEON, Ph.D, Technology Specialist - Lightweight Solution, Volvo Group

Reclaimed Carbon Fiber (rCF) in Blend with Polypropylene Resin

Saeil JEON, Ph.D, Technology Specialist - Lightweight Solution, Volvo Group

Because of the well-known resistance and rejection of bonding at a molecular level between the surface of a carbon fiber and a common manufacturing resin such as polypropylene (PP), stock TP/PP resins are not well suited for optimizing the blend of carbon fiber and a PP resin system. Volvo’s supply chain adapted the chemistry of the stock PP resin so that an increased bonding between the resin and the carbon fiber would occur. The test of the same nonwoven material architecture utilizing both a stock PP resin and a chemistry enhanced PP+ resin has demonstrated a 50% increase in tensile strength when the PP+ enhanced resin is utilized.


9:30am

Plastics Recovered from Shredded End-of-Life Vehicles Brian Riise (speaker), Peter Mackrell, Ron Rau, Ibrahim Patel

Plastics Recovered from Shredded End-of-Life Vehicles

Brian Riise a (speaker), Peter Mackrell b, Ron Rau a, Ibrahim Patel b

  1. MBA Polymers Inc., Worksop, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom
  2. MBA Polymers UK Ltd., Worksop, Nottinghamshire, United Kingdom

Our industry leading separation technology enables us to recover polyolefin and styrenic plastics from complex mixed streams such as shredded end-of-life vehicles. Plastic flakes recovered using our process are compounded and sold as pellets suitable for use in injection molding and extrusion applications. This paper looks at the challenges and benefits of recovering plastics and modifying their properties for use in various injection molding and extrusion applications in the horticultural, construction, packaging and automotive industries.


10:00am

Panel Discussion: Environmental Issues Welch, Lecedra, AIAG
Bing Xu, Ford Motor Company
Marc Robling, Bosch

Panel Discussion: Environmental Issues

Welch, Lecedra, AIAG
Bing Xu, Ford Motor Company
Marc Robling, Bosch


10:30am


Coffee Break & View of Exhibits

Session 8: Novel Materials and Specialty Additives

10:45am

Smart Graphene/Cabon composite & nanotechnology based coating for automotive application Dr Siva Bohm, Prof A S Khanna & Dr Douglas Gordon

Smart Graphene/Cabon composite & nanotechnology based coating for automotive application

Dr Siva Bohm a,b, Prof A S Khanna a & Dr Douglas Gordon b

  1. IIT - Bombay - Department of ME & MS
  2. TATA Steel Europe

To be the market leader in the coil coating, TATA Steel & IIT Bombay jointly presenting the advanced nano technology for meeting customer satisfaction as well as comply with environmental legislations and energy savings.

Graphene not only has outstanding electrical conductivity but also thermal conductivity, combined with strength and barrier, which makes it an exciting new material in the development of conductive applications. Because of its single-atom thickness, pure graphene is transparent, and can be used to make transparent electrodes for light-based applications such as Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or improved solar cells.

The most immediate application for graphene is its use in composite materials & Anti corrosion. Conductive plastics at less than 1 volume percent filling, at low production costs makes graphene-based composites attractive for a variety of uses. Graphene, Cabon fiber and nano zinc oxide has potential market in next generation automotive industry.

In addition we will present coating technology related to Hot stamping of simple automotive parts like door beams and bumper beams. Automotive Boron steel for hot forming is preferably metal coated to prevent scale formation and decarburization during the heating step. AlSi coatings (90% Al and about 10% Si) provide an excellent barrier against high temperature scale formation due to its native oxide (Al2O3) which passivates the coating. However, AlSi-coatings do not provide any active corrosion resistance for the steel substrate during service life of the product in humid environment, which may lead to spots vulnerable to corrosion (cut edges, deformed areas and spots where the coating has been damaged). Therefore attention is now focussing on coatings that do offer active corrosion protection to steel in humid environments. These coatings essentially contain zinc. The use of zinc coatings for hot forming is challenging. During the heating stage (900-950 °C) for hot pressing part of the metallic zinc is either removed by evaporation or by being oxidized and remaining amount dissolves into and reacts with the steel base producing iron-zinc intermetallics.


11:15am

Lightweighting automotive components using novel mica Chris DeArmitt, Business Development Manager, LKAB Minerals

Lightweighting automotive components using novel mica

Chris DeArmitt, Business Development Manager, LKAB Minerals

Automotive applications demand excellent mechanical performance and combined with low density in order to minimize fuel consumption. Another requirement is sound control. This talk will address both these issues. Firstly, a revolutionary phlogopite mica grade called PW80 which delivers equivalent reinforcement to talc at half the loading, thereby giving the opportunity for substantial weight reduction. This is achieved via a special milling process leading to an aspect ratio of over 100:1. Secondly, sound management through the use of magnetite, known to be more effective than barium sulfate and also mica, which is known to reduce sound via a different mechanism. Both of these solutions are already validated in real applications and examples will be given.


11:45am

Stabilization of Polymers for the Automotive Industry Feng Zuo, and Robert Keller, Plastic Additives, BASF Corporation

Stabilization of Polymers for the Automotive Industry

Feng Zuo, and Robert Keller, Plastic Additives, BASF Corporation

New technical developments are enabling the use of plastics in more and more automotive applications attributing to their versatility and properties. This trend has also created an increased demand for effective additives for various applications. OEMs are looking for products that can enhance the vehicle's durability, visual appeal and comfort to attract consumers, while meeting increasingly stricter regulations concerning emissions and fuel consumption. BASF offers the broadest range of products in plastic additives which can help to maintain or increase the desired properties, such as processing, thermal and light stability etc., under production and end-use conditions.


12:15pm

Silicone Elastomers - Clear as Glass Dipl. -Ing. Oliver Franssen (speaker) and Dipl. -Ing. Heiko Bayerl, Momentive (Germany)

Silicone Elastomers - Clear as Glass

Dipl. -Ing. Oliver Franssen (speaker) and Dipl. -Ing. Heiko Bayerl, Momentive (Germany)

Since decades PC and PMMA are materials of choice for optical applications beside glass. The advantage of these polymeric materials compared to glass is the economical manufacturing process, which allows the production of optical parts with much lower energy consumption and less post treatment like milling and polishing.

A new alternative is now available through the "glass-clear" liquid silicone rubbers of the LSR 7000 family of Momentive Performance Materials. These new materials combine the typical LSR properties like high temperature stability and processability with a transparency of 95% and an outstanding UV and blue light stability which makes the material an ideal candidate for the production of lenses for high-power LEDs for automotive and other applications. LED Lighting demands a combination of extreme material properties.

From the processing side, LSR offers the possibility to manufacture cost efficient optical lenses through injection moulding. While for thermoplastic lenses still a large sprue is required to apply a long after-pressure to compensate for the thermal shrinkage of the lens, only a small runner is needed for the LSR injection process. Thus the waste of material is reduced to a minimum.

In automotive applications this material family can provide additional value. Examples include possible weight-saving vs glass, no breaking and brittleness like plastic and glass, availability of very soft optical materials and more.

The paper gives an overview of the special material properties of the ultra-transparent LSR and compares physical data to commercial optical thermoplastics. Application examples highlight present and future automotive potential of this innovative material family combining rubber-like elasticity with full transparency.

Tags for program:

  • Optically clear LSR and functional competitors
  • Processing considerations
  • Discussion of physical and optical properties
  • Application examples and potential in automotive

12:45pm

Overview of Auxetic Materials and Possible Automotive Applications Kendal Novak and Scott Shermetaro, Oakland University

Overview of Auxetic Materials and Possible Automotive Applications

Kendal Novak and Scott Shermetaro, Oakland University

Auxetic materials have a negative Poisson's ratio which means that they laterally expand when stretched. These materials exhibit enhanced properties in multiple areas including indentation resistance, sound absorption, strength, and volume expansion, which have possible applications in the automotive industry. Various auxetic structures were produced using additive manufacturing techniques in ABS plastic and each was tested using digital imaging correlation to investigate how varying configuration affects the overall Poisson's ratio.

1:15pm

Conference Adjourn