Plastics-in-Motion 2017

Global Automotive Plastics Congress & Exhibit
Adoba Hotel, Dearborn, Michigan June 4-7, 2017
Detroit Marriott Troy
Troy, Michigan



CONFERENCE SESSIONS

MONDAY, June 5, 2017

Session 1: Light-weighting Automotive Components

Session 2: Advances In Structural Composites

TUESDAY, June 6, 2017

Session 3: Plastics In Automotive Interiors, Exterior, & Engine Compartment

Session 4: Materials Innovations For Automotive Applications

WENDESDAY, June 7, 2017

Session 5: Innovations In Automotive Plastics Processing & Assembly

Session 6: Smart Materials And Specialty Additives

CONFERENCE AGENDA

Click on a lecture title to view the abstract.

Sunday, June 4, 2017

7:30 - 9:00pm   Welcome Reception & Check-in.


Monday, June 5, 2017


8:00am

Continental Breakfast

8:30am

Keynote Address: Advanced Plastics and Composites Shaping the Car of the Future Brian Krull, Global Director of Innovation-Exteriors, Magna Exteriors

Keynote Address: Advanced Plastics and Composites Shaping the Car of the Future

Brian Krull, Global Director of Innovation-Exteriors, Magna Exteriors

As increasingly stringent emissions standards drive the use of plastics and composites to lower vehicle weight, it's imperative that the industry find new and innovative applications, materials and manufacturing processes. Where advanced materials were previously used only on high-end and niche vehicles, regulatory and market demands require applications across all models. Advanced materials provide the best opportunity to improve performance, styling, strength and safety. A key challenge to overcome is how to modify manufacturing and assembly processes to meet high-volume production with new materials.

Session 1: Light-Weighting Automotive Components

9:30am

Automotive Lightweighting through Manufacturing Process, Materials, and Design Considerations. Jeff Schipper, Global Industry Manager, Proto Labs

Automotive Lightweighting through Manufacturing Process, Materials, and Design Considerations.

Jeff Schipper, Global Industry Manager, Proto Labs

Weight reduction in manufactured components is becoming increasingly important for companies in the automotive industry. In this presentation, you will learn how different manufacturing processes, materials like magnesium, and design techniques can help reduce components' weight and cut costs throughout the product development lifecycle. See how 3D printing, CNC machining and injection molding allow you to reduce the number of components in a product design and learn different ways that you can modify your design to minimize weight. We'll also highlight which lightweighting materials offer improved properties and strength.


10:00am

Replacing Castings with Plastic for Weight and Cost Reduction Derek Barkey, Innova Engineering Inc.

Replacing Castings with Plastic for Weight and Cost Reduction

Derek Barkey, Innova Engineering Inc.

Replacing metal castings with injection-molded plastic can provide both cost and weight savings for automotive applications. Fiber-reinforced plastic is light weight, strong, fatigue resistant, and easily re-cycled. Injection molded plastic is also a faster process than metal casting, allowing high volumes with a lower non-recurring cost. Exploiting the benefits of injection-molded fiber-reinforced plastic to replace metal castings requires a design process that simultaneously optimizes the part and the mold. This paper explores the design aspects that require consideration when replacing a casting with injection-molded plastic. This is illustrated with a representative automotive part that is re-designed with fiber-reinforced plastic, including incorporating metal inserts at fastener locations, design optimization for strength and stiffness, prediction and optimization of fiber orientation, and molding considerations for shrinkage and warpage.

10:30am Coffee Break

11:00am

Lightweighting for Automotive using Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites Nam Hyeong Kim, Hanwha Advanced Materials Corp, South Korea.

Lightweighting for Automotive using Continuous Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastic Composites

Nam Hyeong Kim, Hanwha Advanced Materials Corp, South Korea.

Continuous fiber reinforced thermoplastic Composites (CFRTPC) can lead to significant weight reduction and great improvement of combination properties because of their inherent advantages. It is emerging as a potential for weight reduction in automotive industries. We developed various types of CFRTPC including unidirectional prepregs, laminated sheets, and rods. Reinforcements used with thermoplastic composites are E-glass, carbon and aramid. Selected matrix resins are polypropylene (PP), Nylon. This paper is focused on effect of spreading, impregnation and shaping devices and optimization of process condition for rapid thermoplastic impregnation of fiber bundles. Also, we reviewed application examples such as bumper beam, seat structures, front end carriers and so on using suitable type of materials.


11:30am

Enabling Ultra-Thin Light Weight Automotive Structural Parts with High Flow Long Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics Jeffrey Helms, Global Director, Celanese

Enabling Ultra-Thin Light Weight Automotive Structural Parts with High Flow Long Fiber Reinforced Thermoplastics

Jeffrey Helms, Global Director, Celanese

Automakers continue to look for affordable solutions that deliver component performance while driving part weights down by as much as 30% to drive CAFÉ performance at the vehicle level. Long glass fiber reinforced thermoplastics have traditionally been used in automotive component structures such as instrument panels, front end modules, door module carriers and underbody shields to deliver cost and weight savings relative to metal solutions. To significantly enable lower mass and cost efficient solutions for these subsystems, Celanese has developed a high flow long fiber reinforced thermoplastic addition to the Celstran portfolio which delivers nearly 50% high spiral flow without sacrificing material mechanical properties and interior air quality requirements. These materials enable part wall thickness reductions of up to 50% while maintaining 90% of the component stiffness. Full material characterization for fiber orientation, warpage and rheology have been validated through component trials to provide robust inputs for automotive designs. By enabling thinner wall designs with a more traditional glass fiber reinforcement, delivering significantly lighter weight solutions without the use of higher cost carbon reinforcement will enable automakers and their suppliers to achieve weight targets within program cost targets


12:00pm

A New Generation of Composite Thermoplastics for Light Weight Automotive Applications John Fialka, Manager, Business Development Automotive, INEOS Styrolution America

A New Generation of Composite Thermoplastics for Light Weight Automotive Applications

John Fialka, Manager, Business Development Automotive, INEOS Styrolution America

Styrolution is interested in giving a presentation on a new styrenic copolymer composite (StyLight) for light weight solutions with outstanding surface quality. This technology may be applied to automotive interior applications as well as a range of other structural parts. Styrolution has developed a new thermoplastic composite that delivers an excellent mechanical performance profile in stiffness, strength and impact resistance that is on par with or better than current PA6 or PC based composites in the market for woven glass reinforced thermoplastics. StyLight production processes ensure high quality and low cycle times as complex parts can be produced in a hybrid process. The thermoplastic composite sheets can be thermoformed, back injection molded and decorated in just one processing step. At the same time, the lower shrinkage during the consolidation step of the styrenic copolymer matrix, based on a modified SAN matrix, reduces the surface roughness or "waviness", offering a superior surface quality. Stylight offers a versatile composite solution combining the best qualities for both structural and aesthetic excellence.

12:30pm - 2:30 Free time for lunch
Session 2: Advances in Structural Composites

2:30pm

Validation Of Material Models (vmm) For Crash Simulation Of Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures - Cae Vs. Test Correlation Vinay Virupaksha, Ph.D., General Motors

Validation Of Material Models (vmm) For Crash Simulation Of Automotive Carbon Fiber Composite Structures - Cae Vs. Test Correlation

Vinay Virupaksha, Ph.D., General Motors

The objective of this Validation of Material Models (VMM) Project is to validate physics-based material models for crash simulation of primary load carrying automotive structures made of production-feasible carbon fiber composites. This will include the two Automotive Composites Consortium/USAMP-developed meso-scale models from the University of Michigan and Northwestern University, as well as existing composite material models in four major commercial FEA codes (LS-DYNA, RADIOSS, PAM-CRASH, ABAQUS). The models will be used to predict quasi-static and dynamic crash behavior of a vehicle front end sub-system made of carbon-fiber composites. The project goal is to validate the models for simulating crash of a lightweight carbon-fiber composite front bumper and crush can (FBCC) system. In order to do this, we are determining the crash behavior of a reference steel FBCC; designing, building, and crash testing a composite FBCC predicted to have equivalent crash behavior; and comparing the predictions with the physical crash tests. The crash performance of the composite FBCC should be equivalent to the steel FBCC under various crash-loading modes. The successful validation of these crash models will allow the use of lightweight carbon-fiber composites in automotive structures for significant mass savings.


3:00pm

Locally Reinforcing Carbon Fiber SMC with Unidirectional and Woven Carbon Fiber for Light-Weighting and Design Flexibility Justin McClure, A. Schulman

Locally Reinforcing Carbon Fiber SMC with Unidirectional and Woven Carbon Fiber for Light-Weighting and Design Flexibility

Justin McClure, A. Schulman

In the fabrication of advanced composite structures there are an array of processes available. However, when part complexity increases, performance requirements are demanding, and higher volumes are essential, production options become more limited. Design engineers are enticed by placed fiber methods, such as prepreg molding or various approaches to resin transfer molding (RTM), but find that, even with recent advances, achieving out-of the-mold part finish and acceptable cycle times to support high volume production are elusive. Compression molding using random fiber SMC is well recognized to achieve rapid cycles and to achieve net shape parts including ribs and bosses that maximize function with minimal weight. A limiting factor is that potential knit lines associated with the flow of random fibers is a concern for structural integrity in demanding applications. This paper examines the co-molding of localized unidirectional reinforcement (UD) and woven mat reinforcement with random discontinuous carbon fiber using compression molded sheet molding compounds (CF-SMC). This approach allows designers and engineers unique flexibility in developing lighter weight components with tailored mechanical properties to endure highly demanding physical performance requirements. Compression molding is the process in which a charge or preform is weighed out to the exact amount required to fill the volume of a given tool of a matched metal mold. CF-SMC and UD reinforcement are molded under heat and high pressure to form complex parts with non-uniform nominal walls otherwise unattainable with other lightweight moldable materials such as injection molded thermoplastics. CF-SMC can replace forged and machined metal parts and be processed at lower overall manufacturing costs in higher volumes. CF-SMC competes with prepreg materials where higher volume and lower scrap rates are needed. CF-SMC unique ability to flow and fill ribs and bosses allows for design and manufacturability that prepregs are unable to accomplish without tedious hand labor, high risk for manufacturing defects, long cycle times and potential shear planes.


3:30pm

The Development Of Long Fiber-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) Composites For Structural Automotive Parts Miok Jang, Research Engineer, Lotte Chemical (Korea)

The Development Of Long Fiber-reinforced Thermoplastics (LFT) Composites For Structural Automotive Parts

Miok Jang, Research Engineer, Lotte Chemical (Korea)

This presentation describes the development of long fiber-reinforced thermoplastics (LFT) composites and the broadening range of applications. Beyond conventional injection molding, we developed the advanced LFT technology that combines material with molding analysis. For example, bumper back beam was newly designed to be manufactured from the injection molding process and replaced GMT and steel. The stiffer by profile-extrusion molding with LFT is developed and applied in structural automotive parts.

4:00pm Coffee Break

4:30pm

Carbon Reinforced Nylons: Light Weight In Motion Thilo Stier, Director Global Sales & Innovation, AKRO-PLASTIC GmbH (Germany)

Carbon Reinforced Nylons: Light Weight In Motion

Thilo Stier, Director Global Sales & Innovation, AKRO-PLASTIC GmbH (Germany)

The presentation will discuss the latest developments in carbon reinforced nylons that reaches now 45.000 MPa stiffness and more than 400 MPa flex strength with low density. Combined with the newest findings of metal adhesion together with our Partner Plasmatreat, we have new system ideas for the Tier1. The presentation will show how to meet stiffness and ductility at the same time meeting weight and cost targets.


5:00pm

Rapid Structural Bonding Of Dissimilar Lightweight Materials: Polyolefins, Composites And Metals Dr. W.S. Gutowski (speaker), S.Li, C.Filippou, L.Russell, CSIRO, Future Manufacturing Flagship (Australia)

Rapid Structural Bonding Of Dissimilar Lightweight Materials: Polyolefins, Composites And Metals

Dr. W.S. Gutowski (speaker), S.Li, C.Filippou, L.Russell, CSIRO, Future Manufacturing Flagship (Australia)

The automotive industry has successfully build lightweight vehicles with fuel-efficient engines in order to minimise fuel consumption and exhaust emissions in accordance with legal requirements. Consequently, low density metals such as aluminium, magnesium as well as polymers and fiĀ­bre-reinforced composites come to the focus of car manufacturers.

Rapidly growing need for practical use of such diverse materials as metals, plastics and high-tech composite materials raises the issue of rapid bonding technologies which enable the use of new material combinations providing structural advantages for bonded components versus other joining methods.

Various alternatives of bonding techniques as well as commodity and specialty surface treatments methods including chemical, flame, corona discharge and plasma treatments are also discussed in this paper. We also demonstrate practical examples of the use of CSIRO processes for adhesion control in the automotive industry in specific applications currently in use by companies such as General Motors, Toyota, and Ford.


5:30pm

Intelligent Molecular Adhesive Systems for automotive components Mikkel Kongsfelt, CEO, RadiSurf ApS (Denmark)

Intelligent Molecular Adhesive Systems for automotive components

Mikkel Kongsfelt, CEO, RadiSurf ApS (Denmark)

The strategy of molecular adhesives is to design a chemical interface between metal and plastic components to be joined, in such a smart way that it completely bridges the two materials. The result is an immensely strong bonding between the two materials - with only a few nanometers of adhesion - or bridging - layer.

The layer is applied through strong chemical bonds to the metal layer, allowing for direct overmolding of the plastic component, without destroying the adhesion layer. This is the future of molecular adhesive systems.

6:00pm - 7:00pm Cheese & Wine Reception

Tuesday, June 6, 2017

7:30am Continental Breakfast


8:30am

Keynote Address: Disruptive Change Facing the "Mobility" Supplier Daron Gifford, Partner, Plante Moran

Disruptive Change Facing the "Mobility" Supplier

Daron Gifford, Partner, Plante Moran

Based upon research by Plante & Moran, several megatrends impacting the automotive supplier and manufacturer will be discussed in light of their impact on the supply base at all levels. These megatrends include:

  • Mass/weight reduction
  • Fewer and global vehicle architectures
  • Targeted emerging market growth
  • Next generation powertrains
  • Mobility technology

Critical capabilities and requirements for suppliers and manufacturers to compete in this dramatically changing world of transportation will be discussed. A framework and approach for thinking about your strategies to address the challenges in the future will be highlighted.

Session 3: Plastics in Automotive Interiors, exterior, & engine compartment

9:30am

Plastic body contribution to assisted drive systems Bertrand Hache, Innovation Director, Auto Exterior Division, Plastic Omnium

Plastic body contribution to assisted drive systems

Bertrand Hache, Innovation Director, Auto Exterior Division, Plastic Omnium

The presentation will discuss the important role of plastics in future cars:

Assisted drive major step changes

  • assisted drive is concrete for the next generation
  • Steps change required in screening, accuracy and reliability
  • On top of to actual constraints
  • General benefits of plastics vs detections systems (radars and sensors)

  • EM transparency
  • Best compromise styling/packaging/Impact management
  • solution for off line modules (complex systems preassembly)
  • Challenges ahead of us

  • system efficiency and reliability
  • global system packaging
  • PO specific solutions

    • Scope of products covering body surrounding (bumpers, fenders, closures, roof, …)
    • Optimized design guide lines for system efficiency
    • Specific packaging solutions
    • Solutions for extreme conditions (climat, impact protection, position control, …)

    Conclusion : Assisted drive car challenges result of close collaboration between OEM, sensing system providers and plastic body panels leaders.


10:00am

Innovative process of endless glass fiber reinforcements Eric Kowalewski, Account Manager, Boge Rubber & Plastics

Innovative process of endless glass fiber reinforcements

Eric Kowalewski, Account Manager, Boge Rubber & Plastics

Continuous fiber reinforced plastics offer lightweight solutions which OEM's are requesting in order to reduce fuel consumption and to increase driving performance. The production of a safety-critical component, BOGE Rubber & Plastics Company developed a fully automated manufacturing process, which transforms plastic resin (Nylon 6) along with pre-consolidated textiles (Nylon composite sheets) into production ready Brake Pedals. This product design thereby realized a weight saving over conventional / steel pedals of 40-55%, while maintaining the conventional mechanical strength. Weighing just 355g, this product is the world's first car brake pedal made of polyamide reinforced with continuous glass fibers suitable for large-scale serial production.

10:30am Coffee Break

11:00am

Cool Polymers Technology for Lighting, Connectors, and Heat Sinks hits the mainstream Michael Ruby, Celanese

Cool Polymers Technology for Lighting, Connectors, and Heat Sinks hits the mainstream

Michael Ruby, Celanese

Auto manufacturers continue to think differently about design and materials as part of a continuous quest to maintain compliance with oncoming CAFÉ and emissions regulations. As a result, technologies that allow for functional integration as well as mass reduction are of high interest to design and materials engineers who are leading the charge in changing how light passenger vehicles are conceptualized and built.

Celanese CoolPoly® technology is one such material innovation that allows for both improved design and mass reduction in numerous places in a vehicle. It is a 'tailorable' technology that can provide thermal or electrical conductivity in a variety of polymer matricies.

This presentation will discuss the areas of the vehicle that designers and engineers can utilize Celanese CoolPoly® technology for cost reduction, increased functionality, and mass reduction, including those areas which are already in series commercial applications. A non-exhaustive list includes: Light Emitting Diode (LED) lighting, control system heat sinks, and numerous connector systems. In addition, the tools and expertise that Celanese provides to help in the design, prototyping, and commercial launch process in these kinds of applications will be highlighted.


11:30am

New Generation High-Performance Foams for Automotive Applications Lorry Wang, David Wang, P. Deng, C. Zheng, W.S. Gutowski (speaker), Nicole Chen

New Generation High-Performance Foams for Automotive Applications

Lorry Wanga, David Wanga, P. Dengb, C. Zhengb, W.S. Gutowskib (speaker), Nicole Chena

  • LZ-G, Foshan LinZhi Polymeric Materials Science & Technology, China
  • Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Applied Chemistry Changchun, China

Effective management of noise, vibration and impact (NVI) became a critical issue in the automotive, aviation and other transportation industries design and manufacturing, thus necessitating intensive research in the field of specialty cushioning materials facilitating reduction of adverse effects of NVI.

Open-cell polymeric foams are particularly effective materials for NVI management due to excellent cushioning properties combined with full shape recovery of the impacted or dynamically loaded product.

In this paper we discuss engineering applications of specialty foams exhibiting outstanding energy absorption and dissipation properties which are able to absorb and dissipate up to 90% of impact energy combined with near-zero compression set over prolonged time of continuous or intermittent exposure to static and dynamic forces across a wide temperature range.

Due to these properties, open-cell foams offer significant passive improvement of vehicles safety by preventing or minimising injuries to passengers during collision. The foams are relatively cheap and allow excellent design and manufacturing flexibility facilitating easily forming of complex shapes.

Current automotive applications include lining and cushioning layers and devices in applications such as: door panels, instrument panel, consoles, armrest, glove box, roof and floor lining, seat backs, pillars, knee bolsters, air ducts and boot covers and insulation of engine compartment.

The foams discussed in this paper are also suitable for a broad range of other applications such as: arm rest isolation pads, head rests, bin liners or vibration isolating pads and lining material in areas requiring efficient attenuation of vibration and noise e.g.: body panel clip seals, bumper/facia spacers and pads, cups and coin holders, mirror seals (exterior and interior), fuel tank pads, interior and exterior lamp seals, pads for electronic equipment, rear shelf padding and isolation strips, battery pads, spare wheel cushioning in the spare wheel bin, etc.


12:00pm

New Copolymers for Improving Performance of Nylon in the Automotive Engine Compartment Dr. Ashok M. Adur, Global Commercial Development Director, Vertellus Specialties Inc.

New Copolymers for Improving Performance of Nylon in the Automotive Engine Compartment

Dr. Ashok M. Adur, Global Commercial Development Director, Vertellus Specialties Inc.

Nylon and other polyamides are widely used in many applications including the automotive industry. However to improve its performance especially in the engine compartment, recent developments include the use of alternating copolymers of ethylene and maleic anhydride. This paper will present several innovative uses of these unique copolymers such as improving mechanical properties, HDT and hydrolysis resistance to ethylene-glycol-based radiator fluids, both by using it as part of the glass fiber manufacturing process as well as during compounding. The mechanism of why these benefits are obtained will also be presented.


12:30pm

Primer-less electrostatic painting of automotive exteriors with carbon nanotubes technology Marie Hurtgen (speaker), Michael Claes, Alicia Rul, Nanocyl SA (Belgium)

Primer-less electrostatic painting of automotive exteriors with carbon nanotubes technology

Marie Hurtgen (speaker), Michael Claes, Alicia Rul, Nanocyl SA (Belgium)

Electrostatic painting is commonly used in the automotive industry to reduce paint usage. The electrical grounding of the plastic substrate to be painted (e.g. bumper fascia, body panel, trim, …) is generally ensured by prior application of a conductive primer. A cost effective alternative - used in serial production - consists in using an electrically conductive plastic containing carbon nanotubes (CNT), which allows the suppression of the conductive primer, the reduction of VOC emissions and a simpler painting process.

This work demonstrates for the first time that very low amounts of carbon nanotubes (and hence low electrical conductivity) are sufficient to achieve the same paint transfer as a conductive primer. These observations combined with paint adhesion/appearance results on TPO and ABS/PC parts open up new possibilities for the primer-less painting of automotive exteriors.

1:00pm - 2:30pm Free time for lunch
Session 4: MATERIALS INNOVATIONS FOR AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS

2:30pm

Keynote Lecture: Remapping Automotive's Materials Discovery, Design, and Additive Manufacturing Future Dayton Horvath, Research Associate, Lux Research

Keynote Lecture: Remapping Automotive's Materials Discovery, Design, and Additive Manufacturing Future

Dayton Horvath, Research Associate, Lux Research

Artificial intelligence and the digital era are shaping the form and function of transportation. The fundamental software techniques and tools driving this digitization are finding their way into the Materials world. This talk presents the latest technology developments in materials informatics, design software, and additive manufacturing. The software driving these trends has the potential to accelerate automotive materials design and manufacturing. Learn what artificial intelligence and other software approaches will truly merge form with function in the near term. Digital transformation has reached the materials design and manufacturing world; how much will it accelerate your company's innovation efforts?


3:30pm

Injection-Molded Composites Based on Recycled Carbon Fibers and Natural Fibers Mihaela Mihai (speaker), Karen Stoeffler, Ellen Lee, Harry Lobo, Dan Houston

Injection-Molded Composites Based on Recycled Carbon Fibers and Natural Fibers

Mihaela Mihaia (speaker), Karen Stoefflera, Ellen Leeb, Harry Loboc, Dan Houstond

  • Automotive and Surface Transportation, National Research Council of Canada
  • Additive Manufacturing Research, Ford Motor Company
  • Product Development Center, Ford Motor Company
  • Polymeric Composite Materials and Manufacturing, Ford Motor Company

Carbon fibers (CF) currently have an increased utilization in automotive applications due to their low density, excellent mechanical properties, low thermal expansion, high chemical resistance, and high temperature tolerance. Products such as out-of-date prepregs, manufacturing cut-offs, testing materials, production tools and end-of-life components (essentially coming from the aerospace industry) generate an increasing amount of CF containing waste, from which recycled carbon fibers (rCF) can be extracted. Those rCF are very attractive for the automotive industry due to their excellent residual properties, low environmental footprint, and potential low cost compared to virgin CF. On the other hand, cellulosic fibers coming from forestry or from agricultural sources constitute a promising alternative to mineral fillers and glass reinforcements already used in automotive compounds: they are renewable, widely available, and have low density and good specific mechanical properties. In this work, polypropylene (PP) and nylon (PA6) composites reinforced with rCF and cellulosic fibers were developed for injection-molding applications. Automotive components such as center consoles and engine covers are potential applications for the hybrid composites. In this presentation, Ford and NRC will introduce those new composite materials, which integrate up to 30 wt.% recycled and renewable content. These formulations allow a good balance of mechanical and thermal performance, while being durable, recyclable, lighter and less expensive than conventional materials used in the fabrication of automotive parts.

4:00pm Coffee Break

4:30pm

High Performance, Low Cost Nanoparticle Resins for Light-weight, Fiber-Reinforced Automotive Thermoset Composites James Nelson (speaker), Douglas Goetz, Jay Lomeda, Brett Beiermann, Amit Patel, Ambuj Sharma, Wendy Thompson, 3M Advanced Composites, Automotive and Aerospace Solutions Division, 3M

High Performance, Low Cost Nanoparticle Resins for Light-weight, Fiber-Reinforced Automotive Thermoset Composites

James Nelson (speaker), Douglas Goetz, Jay Lomeda, Brett Beiermann, Amit Patel, Ambuj Sharma, Wendy Thompson, 3M Advanced Composites, Automotive and Aerospace Solutions Division, 3M

The development of an initial portfolio of lower cost, low viscosity, nanoparticle-modified thermoset resins is outlined. The use of these high performance resins, featuring nanocalcite dispersions at high particle loadings (ca. 40-60 wt%), in carbon and glass fiber reinforced composite applications will be demonstrated. The epoxy-based 3MTM Matrix Resins 888X (X=0,1,2,4,5) have been developed with low viscosity processes such as vacuum infusion (ie. VARTM), filament winding, pultrusion, resin transfer molding (RTM) and solvent prepreg operations in mind. Data illustrating the effect of nanoparticle modification on resin properties will be presented. Additionally, the use of these new resins in composite applications such as carbon fiber driveshafts, composite overwrapped pressure vessels, fiberglass laminates and dimensionally stable composite tools will be featured. The ability to create low cost composites through use of these nanoparticle-modified resins will be discussed.


5:00pm

Radiation Induced Long Chain Branching of Polyolefins: Light-Weighting Through Improved Material Distribution and Cellular Processing Edward M. Phillips, Polyolefin Specialist, Elkton, on behalf of E-BEAM Services Inc.

Radiation Induced Long Chain Branching of Polyolefins: Light-Weighting Through Improved Material Distribution and Cellular Processing

Edward M. Phillips, Polyolefin Specialist, Elkton, on behalf of E-BEAM Services Inc.

Radiation modification of polyolefins using high energy electron beam technology has been practiced commercially for many years but is mainly thought of in terms of cross-linking. However, radiation induced long chain branched LLDPE, PP and EVA exhibit excellent melt strength enabling them to be used in melt phase thermoforming, extrusion blow molding and even low density foams. Because of their unique rheological behavior, improved material distribution in complex shaped thermoformed and blow molded articles result in significant part weight reduction. High melt strength also allows for the production of low density closed celled structures. This presentation will detail how this readily available technology can provide creative solutions to challenging issues related to light-weighting.


5:30pm

Foam injection molding of a glass reinforced polyamide-66 for automotive applications Sofia Lanzillo (speaker), Beniamino Villacci, Giovanni Affinita, Alfonso Molaro, Innocenzo Macchiarolo, Valentina Volpe, Roberto Pantani

Foam injection molding of a glass reinforced polyamide-66 for automotive applications

Sofia Lanzilloa(speaker), Beniamino Villaccia, Giovanni Affinitaa, Alfonso Molaroa, Innocenzo Macchiaroloa, Valentina Volpeb, Roberto Pantanib

  • SAPA srl, via Vittoria Colonna 14, Napoli (NA), Italy
  • DIIN - University of Salerno, via Giovanni Paolo II, Fisciano (SA), Italy

The present work reports the preliminary results obtained by a technical and scientific collaboration between SAPA s.r.l. and the University of Salerno, which aims at obtaining lighter plastic parts made of glass reinforced PA66 for automotive applications. The parts were obtained by foam injection molding. This processing technology is a variant of the more traditional injection molding technique which is used to produce plastic parts of a well-defined shape, consuming less material without sacrificing mechanical properties. The saving of material is achieved by creating voids by means of a physical foaming agent. In particular, the plastic resin is mixed with a supercritical gas inside the cylinder during the batching phase. The forward motion of the screw forces the resin/gas solution into the mold cavity with a volume lower that what needed to obtain the final geometry of the part. Due to the pressure drop between the nozzle and the cavity, the volatile material forms gas bubbles in the melt and expands the melt until it completely fills the cavity.

In this work, foam injection molding has been carried out by using nitrogen as a physical blowing agent. The adopted material is a PA66 with 30% glass fiber. Several molding conditions are analyzed: mold thickness, injection temperature, gas content.

The effects of these molding conditions on the part properties, namely weight reduction with respect to the unfoamed part and mechanical resistance, are systematized and presented, so that the pros and cons of applying the process to the specific material for automotive applications can be assessed.

6:00pm - 7:00pm Cheese & Wine Reception

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

8:00am Continental Breakfast

Session 5: Innovations in Automotive Plastics Processing & Assembly

8:30am

Film Decoration Technologies for Automotive Plastics - Types and Processes Jeffrey J. Bailey, President, Seraco, Inc.

Film Decoration Technologies for Automotive Plastics - Types and Processes

Jeffrey J. Bailey, President, Seraco, Inc.

As the use of plastics and composites increases in the automotive segment, the method of decorating these substrates is gaining more attention as the needs and design styling have become more demanding for these surfaces. The proposed presentation will discuss the various film options for decorating plastics versus traditional wet painting, chrome plating, or mold-in-color. Film options that will be discussed include paint films, printed effect films, and metal appearance films. Decoration techniques will include IMR (In Mold Release), Insert Injection Molding, Thick Sheet Thermoforming, and a hybrid system known as Part Lamination.


9:00am

DecoJect - combines color, structure and haptics into a single production step Joachim Kragl, Director Advanced Molding Systems, Engel

DecoJect - combines color, structure and haptics into a single production step

Joachim Kragl, Director Advanced Molding Systems, Engel

IMD technologies are increasingly replacing painting in the production of car interiors in order to combine a high quality surface finish with a high degree of flexibility for small batch sizes and low unit costs. With the DecoJect film-based solution from Benecke-Kaliko, ENGEL presents the next evolution in mold decoration. The combination of injection molding with IMG (in-mold graining) in a roll-to-roll process is a unique possibility to achieve highest flexibility in the production of decorated interior automotive parts. Unlike conventional IMD processes, the paint is not simply transferred from the film onto the component. Instead, the film is punched out and stays on the component. This way, in addition to color and pattern, surface structure and haptics are achieved in a single step.


9:30am

Melt management solution for class "A" surface finish and optimal part performance John Blundy, President, INglass USA - HRSflow

Melt management solution for class "A" surface finish and optimal part performance

John Blundy, President, INglass USA - HRSflow

Profiled injection rate of molten plastic is accomplished by the injection molding machine. Recent developments in hot runner technology provide the opportunity to fine tune the flow and volume of the melt in selectable parameters, thus improving the process effecting cosmetic and part performance characteristics.


10:00am

Weight reduction of plastic components by using modern processing technology Juergen Giesow PhD

Weight reduction of plastic components by using modern processing technology

Juergen Giesow PhD

With the continued focus on the increased cost of energy there is an excellent opportunity to increase energy efficiency through weight reduction of injection molded components. 'Light weighting' of parts while maintaining, or even improving, their performance in their respective application fields, such as automotive and aerospace fuel efficiency, is now a focal point in the injection molding industry.


10:30am

Effect Of Rapid Heating And Cooling On Appearance And Surface Performance Of Molded-in-color Materials Kelvin Hux, Honda R&D Americas, Materials Research Division

Effect Of Rapid Heating And Cooling On Appearance And Surface Performance Of Molded-in-color Materials

Kelvin Hux, Honda R&D Americas, Materials Research Division

To deliver customers the value that they expect and demand, highly visible automotive interior parts must retain a high-quality appearance and performance. Achieving the desired features of high-quality and performance, while reducing cost with molded-in-color application, is a well-known challenge. This study investigates the effectiveness of adding rapid heating and cooling to the manufacturing process of molded-in-color parts to accomplish these goals. After production, environmental conditioning and scratch testing was conducted to determine the effects of this process on surface appearance, texture, and performance. Although appearance improvements were observed, the scratch resistance of materials continues to be a concern for molded-in-color interior applications.

11:00am Coffee Break
Session 6: Smart Materials and Specialty Additives

11:30am

There is More to Scratch Resistance than Scratch Chip Netzel, Key AccountManager, Croda

There is More to Scratch Resistance than Scratch

Chip Netzel, Key AccountManager, Croda

The drive to use plastics in automotive applications is increasing. Plastics intrinsically have poor scratch resistance than the materials they replace. This presentation discusses how slip additives can be used to boost scratch performance and why there is more to assessing and improving scratch resistance than simply measuring scratch visibility. Croda will demonstrate how different additives migrate, their effects on visible bloom and how the stability impacts on organoleptics and colour properties.


12:00am

Light-weighting using Hydrocerol chemical foaming agents Joseph Raborn, Business Development Manager, Clariant

Light-weighting using Hydrocerol chemical foaming agents

Joseph Raborn, Business Development Manager, Clariant

This presentation will demonstrate and explain current Light-weighting practices which use Hydrocerol chemical foaming agents, including core back injection molding and gas counter pressure techniques to achieve Class A surfaces. In addition to density reduction, additional benefits of cycle time and process improvement will be explored.


12:30pm

New Developments in Chemical Foaming Agents Improve TPO Properties in Injection Molding Peter Schroeck, President & CEO, Reedy Chemical Foam & Specialty Additives

New Developments in Chemical Foaming Agents Improve TPO Properties in Injection Molding

Peter Schroeck, President & CEO, Reedy Chemical Foam & Specialty Additives

The author will present data on how a new generation of chemical foaming agents in conjunction with next generation TPO technology can retain and often improve certain mechanical and physical properties while reducing the mass/density and weight of injection molded foamed TPO applications.

Attention will be paid to how understanding synergism between polymer and foam additive chemistries can overcome common challenges of foam molding including; impact, tensile, flex, compression and in particular, surface qualities.

1:00pm Conference Adjournment